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Tips and information


The below information has been gathered from various internet sources. Please use them ONLY as a guide and either research more in detail or consult your doctor/nutritionist for what is best for you.

Nutritional information

Nutritional values vary between brands and products as well as the amount used. To get a more accurate value based on the ingredients and amount you use, check out this helpful calculator.

Some suggestions for oils to use

Coconut
Palm
Canola
High oleic safflower and sunflower oil
Avocado
Peanut
Palm
Sesame oil
Avocado
Canola
Coconut
Olive
Sesame
High oleic safflower and sunflower oil.
Flax
Olive
Peanut
Toasted sesame
Walnut

Different types of milk

After it’s taken from the cow, the milk is pasteurized (heated, then quickly cooled) to kill bacteria such as E. coli, salmonella, and listeria. It’s an excellent source of protein, calcium, and vitamins D and K.

Good to know: Getting more (skim) milk may help you avoid weight gain. Recent research has found that a lack of calcium may trigger the release of certain hormones, leading to increased fat storage.

Cows that produce organic milk are given organic feed or roam freely and graze on pesticide-free grass. They’re not treated with synthetic growth hormones to increase milk production or injected with antibiotics to prevent illness. (But like traditional milk, organic is pasteurized.) Although experts maintain that there’s no nutritional difference between organic and traditional milk, two studies from Newcastle University, in England, found that the organic variety contains higher concentrations of some beneficial omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants. It also can cost twice as much as regular milk.

Good to know: Organic milk contains the most health benefits in summer; the levels of inflammation-reducing fatty acids are at their peak then, because cows have access to more fresh grass

Soy milk’s base is an extraction from mature soy beans; it’s typically mixed with water and some type of natural sweetener. Soy milk is naturally low in saturated fat and cholesterol-free. Slightly thicker than cow’s milk, it’s safe for people who have dairy allergies or who are lactose-intolerant.

Good to know: Because soy milk is plant-based, it doesn’t have as much protein as cow’s milk. Flavored soy milk contains less protein than unflavored, since the flavoring reduces the protein content per ounce.

Roasted almonds are blended, and the resulting liquid is then enriched with nutrients (like calcium, vitamin D, and the antioxidant vitamin E) and may be sweetened or flavored. Almond milk is free of saturated fat, cholesterol, and lactose, and the unsweetened versions have just 60 calories a cup.

Good to know: The sweet and nutty flavor goes well with coffee or cereal, so it’s a tasty alternative for dieters. However, it contains very little protein.

Rice milk is created from a mixture of partially milled rice and water and is available in a variety of flavors, including chocolate, vanilla, and carob. The least likely of all the milk products to trigger allergies, it’s a good option for those who can’t drink soy, nut, or cow’s milk. It has no saturated fat or cholesterol, but almost no protein.

Good to know: Rice milk often comes packaged in an aseptic container and doesn’t have to be refrigerated until it’s opened.